BANU QASI PDF

Lubb subsequently married Sayyida and forgave the unpaid half of the ransom. The castellan of Roda sent emissaries to sue for peace, offering tribute, but al-Tawil rejected them and destroyed the castle. He launched another attack on Monte Pedroso and Oliola , taking prisoners whom he ransomed for 13, gold pieces. However a second Barcelona campaign resulted in the death of Muhammad al-Tawil on 23 October

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The tiny emirate was faced by enemies in several directions. Although never realized, the threat of Frankish attempts to regain control over the western Pyrenees was a real one. Though Muslim, they frequently intermarried with other regional nobility. Such acts on the part of the Umayyads demonstrated their failure to ever fully resolve the problem of effective, central control of outlying regions. First rise to prominence The speculated homeland of Count Cassius was a narrow strip across the Ebro from Tudela.

Of these, it has been suggested that the second may be the Abu Taur, Wali of Huesca , who invited Charlemagne to Zaragoza in Likewise, the Banu Salama , removed from power in Huesca and Barbitanya area of Barbastro at the end of the 8th century, may have derived from Abu Salama.

The fate of Musa ibn Fortun is debated. In the next generation, Mutarrif ibn Musa, assassinated in Pamplona in by pro- Frankish interests, [7] was likely a son of Musa ibn Fortun. Musa ibn Musa Main article: Musa ibn Musa ibn Qasi While Musa had been orphaned at an early age, his military activity may have begun in the s, and the Banu Qasi possibly Musa himself most probably participated in the second Battle of Roncevaux Pass along with their relatives of Pamplona, [9] an event leading to the establishment of the kingdom of Pamplona.

Musa repeatedly submitted, only to rise again. Emir Muhammad then stripped Musa of his titles and restored direct Cordoban control over the region. Musa died in of wounds received in a petty squabble with a son-in-law, and the family disappeared from the political scene for a decade.

It is presumed that the members of the family associated with the Cordoban court and military campaigns, but no record of their presence there survives. By the time the Banu Qasi reappear, they had lost control of most of their lands, being left with just a small area surrounding Arnedo.

First, the residents of Huesca called on Mutarrif ibn Musa ibn Qasi for leadership. Fortun ibn Musa occupied Tudela, whose governor the Banu Qasi imprisoned at Arnedo, then killed following an escape. Lubb also occupied and refortified Viguera. In the next year, , Muhammad launched a campaign against the various northern rebels. Muhammad ibn Lubb Over the next decade, following the deaths of his father and two uncles, Muhammad ibn Lubb ibn Qasi maneuvered to become the leader of the family.

Earlier hostage taking by all parties greatly complicated the situation. Hashim did not want to antagonize Alfonso who was holding his son. In , the emir sent two military campaigns into the region and took Zaragoza, although chronicler ibn Hayyan reports that Muhammad ibn Lubb had sold the city to count Raymond I of Pallars and Ribagorza prior to its fall. Muhammad ibn Lubb tested his power against the new emirs, and they responded by again trying to balance Banu Qasi power in the region, giving Zaragoza to the rival Tujibids, and Huesca to Muhammad ibn Abd al-Malik al-Tawil of the Muladi Banu Shabrit clan.

There followed a period of relative peace and collaboration between Muhammad ibn Lubb and al-Tawil. In , he was refortifying Monzon when al-Tawil of Huesca tried his luck. To buy his freedom, al-Tawil ceded lands between Huesca and Monzon to Lubb, and agreed to pay , gold dinares for the possession of Huesca. Paying 50, immediately, he gave his son Abd al-Malik and daughter Sayyida as hostages to ensure payment of the second half. Lubb would relent, forgiving the remaining debt and returning the hostages except Sayyida, who he married.

He sent his brother Mutarrif, who was proclaimed their lord. Decline With the fall of Lubb, his local rivals immediately fell upon the Banu Qasi lands. Sancho descended toward Calahorra. The Tujibids finally broke the siege of Zaragoza and captured Ejea. After destroying several castles, they developed cold feet and withdrew, but were caught by Sancho. After a brief siege, he was able to reclaim the city for his family, as well as Lleida.

The latter proved victorious, killing Mutarrif in Their rivals the Tujibids would follow their model, making an independent peace with Leon in , a move that resulted in a punitive expedition from the Caliph similar to those of prior years against the Banu Qasi.

The Tujibids would eventually establish a full-fledged Taifa kingdom centered at Zaragoza. They fell out and ibn Qasi was assassinated in by his own men. Leadership of the Banu Qasi The following men are the documented leaders of the Banu Qasi entried in italics are of uncertain affiliation to the family : Abu Taur, Wali of Huesca , fl.

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Musa repeatedly submitted, only to rise again. Ibn Hazm reports that Yunus had descendants, but provides no further details. Musa died in of wounds received in a petty squabble with a son-in-law, [19] and the family disappeared from the political scene for a decade. It is presumed that the members of the family associated with the Cordoban court and military campaigns, but no record of their presence there survives.

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Muhammad al-Tawil of Huesca

According to the 10th century Muwallad historian Ibn al-Qutiyya, Count Cassius converted to Islam in as the mawali client of the Umayyads , shortly after the Umayyad conquest of Hispania. The tiny Basque emirate was faced by enemies in several directions. Although never realized, the threat of Frankish attempts to regain control over the Western Pyrenees was a real one. The Banu Qasi were a local, rather than a foreign-imposed, Muslim regime, and while nominally clients of the caliphate, they continually shifted alliances among the Basques of Pamplona , Aragon and Ribagorza to the north, other muladi dynasties of the Ebro Valley, and the Umayyads to the south over the next two centuries. Though Muslim, they frequently intermarried with the Christian Basque nobility. Such acts on the part of the Umayyads demonstrated their failure to ever fully resolve the problem of effective, central control of outlying regions.

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