ECO SKYSCRAPERS KEN YEANG PDF

For Yeang, buildings need to be simple, flexible, able to be assembled and disassembled recyclable , and integrate seamlesslesly with the natural environment — the building should always be influenced by the site specifics of ecology, physical landscape and climate. Yeang as a campaigner for effective green design understands the complexities of sustainability. In his own words he states; We would be mistaken to see green design as simply about eco-engineering. These engineering systems are indeed important part of green design and its technologies are rapidly developing and advancing towards a green built environment and architecture but these are not exclusively the only considerations in green design. These are certainly useful checklists but they are not comprehensive.

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Questioning what constitutes the characteristics of ecologically responsible architecture, may not now seem like such an extraordinary pursuit. Ken Yeang studied architecture at the Architectural Association AA in London, an institution with a tradition of radical thinking. It was here that he first began to question architectures role within the context of a growing concern for the environment, energy and sustainability.

In Ken Yeang became one of the first architects to undertake a PhD on the subject of ecological design. He enrolled in the doctoral programme in the Department of Architecture at Cambridge University.

The nature of the problem is therefore site specific. There will never be a standard "one size fits all" solution. Three main forces initially drove this methodology. The first was climatic. That buildings should be designed to optimise the ambient conditions within spaces and this would ultimately result in new building forms that are specific to their locations.

The second was cultural. That architecture needs to respond to the local conditions of life. Human Resource Institute, Hong Kong Chongqing Tower, China These three methodologies culminated in the development of the bioclimatic skyscraper, for which Ken Yeang has become most famous.

He proposed an approach to tall buildings that respond to the climatic conditions of their site. Often incorporating the integration of vegetation and vertical gardens, use of skycourts, natural ventilation and the influence of solar geometry to achieve self-shading structures.

Many of the ecologically sustainable buildings being developed today, owe their design principles to the methodology Ken Yeang developed almost forty years ago. He continues to apply his principles of ecoarchitecture today in his practice T. To see a cross section of his work and design awards, visit the following websites of his practices.

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Eco Skyscrapers

His honorary degrees include D. University of Malaya , , D. Arch Hon. Universidad Ricardo Palma, Peru , D. Sc Hon. Taylors University, Malaysia Other courses attended includes business management at the Malaysian Institute of Management, the Singapore Institute of Management and a short course at Harvard Business School.

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Green-Architecture through Bio-climatic Skyscraper design | T.R Hamzah & Yeang | Ken-Yeang

Questioning what constitutes the characteristics of ecologically responsible architecture, may not now seem like such an extraordinary pursuit. Ken Yeang studied architecture at the Architectural Association AA in London, an institution with a tradition of radical thinking. It was here that he first began to question architectures role within the context of a growing concern for the environment, energy and sustainability. In Ken Yeang became one of the first architects to undertake a PhD on the subject of ecological design. He enrolled in the doctoral programme in the Department of Architecture at Cambridge University. The nature of the problem is therefore site specific. There will never be a standard "one size fits all" solution.

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