TAGHVIM IRANI 1394 PDF

It is usually celebrated in the evening by performing rituals such as jumping over bonfires and lighting off firecrackers and fireworks. Trail mix and berries are also served during the celebration. In Iran, people wear disguises and go door-to-door banging spoons against plates or bowls and receive packaged snacks. On the thirteenth day of the New Year, Iranians leave their houses to enjoy nature and picnic outdoors, as part of the Sizdebedar ceremony. The greenery grown for the Haft-sin setting is thrown away, particularly into a running water.

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In the first year the people carried on using the old calendar, anticipating festival dates by five days. As each day is named after a god, it is important to observe the celebrations on the right day.

Thus the fravasis festival, which in the old calendar was kept between sunset on 30 Spandarmad and sunrise on 1 Frawardin, was now observed throughout the epagemonai. In the second year of the reform, the old 30 Spandarmad was the new 25 Spandarmad, so from then on the festival covered eleven days, up to the new 1 Frawardin. Five days was considered enough for other festivals, however. In all the lands where the Persian calendar was used the epagemonai were placed at the end of the year.

To offset the difference between the agricultural year and the calendar year the tax-gathering season began after the harvest the start of the araji land-tax year was delayed by one month every years.

A Roman historian, Quintus Curtius Rufus, describing a ceremony in BC, writes: The magi were followed by three hundred and sixty-five young men clad in purple robes, equal in number to the days of a whole year; for the Persians also divided the year into that number of days. Based on the Greek tradition, Seleucids introduced the practice of dating by era rather than by the reign of individual kings.

Their era became known as that of Alexander, or later the Seleucid era. Since the new rulers were not Zoroastrians, Zoroastrian priests lost their function at the royal courts, and so resented the Seleucids. Although they began dating by eras, they established their own era of Zoroaster. Priests had no Zoroastrian historical sources, and so turned to Babylonian archives famous in the ancient world. From these they learned that a great event in Persian history took place years before the era of Alexander.

But the priests misinterpreted this date to be the time the "true faith" was revealed to their prophet, and since Avestan literature indicates that revelation happened when Zoroaster was 30 years old, BCE was taken as his year of birth.

The date entered written records as the beginning of the era of Zoroaster, and indeed, the Persian Empire. Their names for the months and days are Parthian equivalents of the Avestan ones used previously, differing slightly from the Middle Persian names used by the Sassanians.

When in April of CE the Parthian dynasty fell and was replaced by the Sasanid, the new king, Ardashir I , abolished the official Babylonian calendar and replaced it with the Zoroastrian. This involved a correction to the places of the gahanbar, which had slipped back in the seasons since they were fixed. Other countries, such as the Armenians and Choresmians, did not accept the change. The new dates were: No.

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